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My MBA journey: “It’s about horsepower not brain power and I think that anyone who doubts their ability to do it, my advice would be to go for it”

Taking on two years of part-time study, whilst working in a full time job and raising a young family is no small task, but as Barry Gavigan (40) found out, it can be very rewarding and can also lead to greater things, career wise.

Gavigan has a degree in engineering from the University of Limerick and works for British Telecom. With years of management experience under his belt, he decided to go for a new job but wasn’t even shortlisted for interview. He began to ask the question, why?

The feedback he was given showed he was pigeonholed into engineering. He decided to take back control and have his management experience formally recognised in the form of a Master of Business Administration (MBA) at Dublin City University in 2013.

It wasn’t all plain sailing and he encountered many “peaks and troughs” along the way, but ultimately the hard work paid off.

“It’s a significant investment, both financially and of personal time. The family have to be brought in to it. I had a 4 year old, 2 year old and a newborn in the middle of it and I also changed jobs internally. It does involve a lot of personal sacrifice but it’s not one of these excruciating scenarios, and there are peaks and troughs, like your work life. The real ability is to cope with the workload and stay on top of it. It did mean sacrificing nights out and getting up early to study before the kids got up. It was a trade-off but good support from home was vital.”

As an MBA is usually paid for, or part paid for by the employer, it’s vital that they give full support. “My employer was extremely supportive. The MBA required a half day on Thursdays and other times outside of that, so the employer needs to be very committed towards it as well. British Telecom was very accommodating and flexible. It’s a two-way street, my commitment to them was that my work wouldn’t suffer and they got flexibility out of me in other ways.”

Gavigan says the MBA has broadened his mind and made him understand the value of carrying out a task in a certain way. “You recognise why best practice is used,” he says.

It has also got him a new job in another sector, something he says the MBA gave him the confidence to go for.

Peer learning is another key element of the course and he says the insight into other industries is invaluable. “People frankly and honestly share their experiences and rationale behind why a business has taken a certain line.”

He says he would advise anyone considering the masters to “stop procrastinating” and get on with applying.

“It’s about horsepower not brain power and I think that for anyone who doubts their ability to do it, my advice would be to go for it. Everyone who did it had busy lives and busy jobs but they all juggled it and managed it.”

This article was originally published in conversation with the Irish Times.

To learn more about how the DCU Executive MBA fits with your career goals, download our brochure here.

A DCU student has been selected as one of 60 finalists who will present papers at the General Assembly of the United Nations Headquarters in New York.

Luke McCluskey, a third year Global Business (Spain) student, said he was absolutely over the moon to have been chosen as a winner. The first two years of Luke’s degree were spent in DCU and he is currently studying in Madrid, Spain as part of the programme.

He said:

“I am absolutely over the moon to have been chosen as a winner. I am extremely grateful for everything DCU has given me and I would like to thank all the DCU lecturers I have had since I began my studies, without whom none of this would have been possible. DCU is a wonderful university, and I hope to represent it as best I can at the United Nations”.

The students will travel on an all-expenses-paid trip to New York at the end of this month to present action plans related to the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. They will attend a Global Youth Forum at Hofstra University, Hempstead New York to help prepare for their presentations.

Luke McCluskey is the first Irish person to win the Many Languages, One World competition which is run by ELS Language Services and the United Nations Academic Impact.

The competition received 3,635 entries from 165 countries around the world. Students had to submit essays written in one of the six UN official languages that was not their first language. Luke submitted his essay in Spanish and discussed the important role that multilingualism plays in fostering global citizenship and cultural understanding.

He was then selected as one of the 60 finalists following an interview process.

Click here to learn more about DCUBS’s Global Business courses.

A team within the DCU Centre for Family Business was commissioned by Fingal County Council to complete this case study. The Family Business Report, Lessons in Resilience and Success: a Snapshot of Multi-generational Family Businesses in Fingal, Dublin was produced by Martina Brophy and Eric Clinton. Their study follows twelve family businesses which are all multi-generational, family-owned and head-quartered in Fingal. Through conducting interviews with these individuals they were able to distinguish needs, challenges and strengths that come with running a family business.

 

“Family businesses are a complex and highly resourceful business type. Knowledge, learnings, resources, values and traditions pass across generations of a family: often, what is found are strategic resources and capabilities that can make a family firm distinctive and competitively advantaged,” writes Dr. Eric Clinton in this study.

 

The report provides a snapshot of 12 multi-generational family businesses in Fingal with family involvement ranging from second to fourth generation. Between them they employ over 3,500 and have turnovers ranging from €1.5 million to in excess of €100m per annum.

Business & Finance, Ireland’s leading business magazine, have covered the topic in an article, Talent in Family Business. Dr. Eric Clinton, Director of the DCU Centre for Family Business, covers a variety of topics within the topic of family business from how much family should get involved to how important it is to become a cohesive team.

Families have an effect in the businesses day-to-day happenings whether it is positive or negative. Thus, through the Family Business study Clinton and Brophy come together and provide information and recommendations on how to run a successful family run business.

 

Check out what the DCU Centre for Family Business is all about:

 

 

 

 

Congratulations to Doireann Sheelan, a DCU Executive MBA student, who received a Special Award for her individual contribution at the recent MBA Association of Ireland Strategy Challenge competition, held recently at Waterford Institute of Technology.

Doireann was part of team, with fellow Executive MBA Students Kalum King, Neil Curran and James Cannon, who presented on the case study “Turkish Airlines – Widen Your World”. While they did not win the competition (the prize went to WIT) they acquitted themselves admirably receiving great praise from the judges for the depth of their analysis.

DCU1

DCU Executive MBA Team (Kalum King, Neil Curran and James Cannon)

This annual competition, hosted by the MBA Association of Ireland (MBAAI), attracts entrants from all the universities and institutes of technology in Ireland that run MBA programmes. Peter McNamara, Professor of Management & Head of School at NUI Maynooth, and Chairperson of the competition, commented: “All four of the teams did a very good job of analysing the case and making recommendations, especially under considerable time pressure.”

The DCU Executive MBA is now recruiting ambitious participants for September 2016.

For more information, visit postgrad.dcu.ie/mba or  email mba@dcu.ie.

 

Pictured is the DCU MBA team with the MBA Association of Ireland President Alacoque McMenamin,

In this blog, Kalum King (MBA1) shares his experience of year 1 of the DCU Executive MBA programme:

With the first year of the MBA at DCU now drawing to a close, it feels like the perfect time to reflect on the journey I have been through since the course commenced in September 2015. Like many, I was intrigued by the prospect of what the MBA program at DCU could offer me in terms of knowledge and experience.

My MBA journey commenced with an ‘Induction’ in early September. After the initial meeting with the rest of the class it was clear to me that this was going to be a unique opportunity for us all and would provide an excellent opportunity to learn from each other in a very comfortable but challenging learning environment.

I had often heard that the MBA experience is not just about the lectures, the assignments and exams, but that a key aspect of the experience is the interaction and knowledge sharing with your fellow students. The mix of personalities and calibre of my fellow students was impressive and they had experience within a wide range of industries from the armed forces to pharmaceuticals. The ‘Induction’ was a great way for everyone to transition onto the course and a great opportunity to get to know the group you would be spending the next two years with.

With the ‘Induction’ now over and everyone now comfortable (ish!) with referencing, so began the Semester 1 modules of Marketing, Organisational Behaviour & Change and Accounting for Decision Making. Marketing was a very enjoyable and interesting module, and probably the one I learnt the most from in terms of practical application to the business I work for. A key aspect of this module was a group presentation to be delivered to the lecturer and the rest of the class. My group found ourselves tackling the subject of ‘Digital Technology in the Luxury Goods Market’ and for which we scored relatively well on. Not bad I thought for a group that consisted of people from a range of industries that included public sector, pharmaceuticals and building materials! Straight away the class found themselves being challenged in a healthy way that would ultimately enhance our knowledge base of the subject.

Organisational Behaviour & Change was next up covering key business concepts such as, organisational culture, transformational leadership and (everybody’s favourite!) power. The delivery of this topic by the lecturer was a key highlight for the class. The lecturer’s friendly and natural teaching style really brought the course to life for us all and was very enjoyable indeed.

As a Chartered Accountant myself and having completed many years of study on the subject I must admit I wasn’t thrilled by the prospect of the Accounting for Decision Making module. However, I was impressed by the lecturer’s ability to break down difficult accounting concepts into bite-size chunks for the class and I felt the class responded very well to this approach. I think everyone made it through the class okay!

A couple of exams in January 2016 brought Semester 1 to a close and after a short break Semester 2 commenced.

The topics in Semester 2 included Business Economics, Business Strategy and Managing People & Organisations. Business Economics was an extremely interesting module but highly challenging as well, as we all tried to get our heads round the intricacies of the Irish and Global economy (and this was before ‘Brexit’ !!).

Within the Business Strategy module the class encountered what must be considered as one of the most unique and effective learning tools, known as the ‘Airline Simulation’. This simulation exercise consisted of the groups competing against each other by setting up an airline company (and strategy) and trying to effectively deliver on the company’s strategy within the simulation itself. It really is a brilliant experience and gave opportunity for some groups to obtain ‘bragging rights’ (all in good humour of course!) which I felt added to the overall learning experience.

The final module was Managing People & Organisations which I felt really developed my understanding and thinking process in relation to the topic. By the end of the module I had definitely become a firm supporter of the emerging ‘Evidence Based’ approach to the subject.

I must also mention the fantastic ‘Residency Weekend’ as part of the Enterprise Engagement module. In February 2016 we visited a number of companies in Cork which was a great experience. The companies we visited included Dairygold, Wisetek and Voxpro who kindly facilitated a tour and visit from the class which was a great opportunity for us all and very much appreciated.

Overall, I would describe my experience of the MBA program at DCU as unique, challenging and thoroughly enjoyable. Throughout my first year I have been hugely impressed by the high quality of the program and the overall learning experience from the lecturers to the interaction with my fellow students.

Finally, I would encourage anyone intrigued by what an MBA program can offer to attend one of the ‘taster’ courses held in the DCU Business School. I expect you will be as impressed as I was and I look forward to seeing you next year.

– Kalum King, MBA1

Interested in learning more about our Executive MBA programme? Download our brochure here

A number of our current students and graduates enjoyed a great weekend of success at the Athletics Ireland GloHealth National Senior Championships in Morton Stadium, Santry on the weekend.

Current students to win national medals included Catherine Mc Manus (MINT & MMK) who placed 2nd in the 200m and 2nd as part of her club’s 4x400m team,  Cormac Kelly (MINT) who came 3rd  in the 1500m and Sarah McCarthy (AF) who placed 3rd in the Long Jump. Of our recent graduates, Mark Christie (MFCM, BBS) came 2nd in the 10,000m.

After the championships, nine DCU athletes (past/present) were selected to compete at the European Track & Field Championships in Amsterdam from July 6th – 10th. DCUBS Masters student Catherine McManus was amongst those selected and gained a place on the Women’s 4x100m Relay squad.

This is a guide to the main points relating to the Brexit situation by Anthony Foley, Senior Lecturer in Economics, DCU Business School.

 1. The UK has voted to leave the EU. This necessitates the establishment of a new set of rules governing movement of goods, services, capital and people between the UK and the rest of the EU. In addition it will affect a wide range of other issues e.g. Irish student access to UK universities and fees. The Brexit vote was exclusively about staying or leaving; there was no vote on alternative post-Brexit regimes. The Brexit side does not have a unified view on what should replace the EU membership rules. The EU side is also weak on the details of a post membership situation.

2. The new set of economic relationship rules are unknown and uncertain and will derive from negotiations between the EU as a whole and the UK. There is no guarantee that the negotiations will be friendly and designed to minimise economic disruption. They may be grudging and spiteful. One view is that the EU will offer a poor deal on economic relations to discourage other member states from leaving.

3. The exit timescale is related to Article 50 of the Treaty. A member which  decides to leave notifies the European Council of its intent. The European Council then initiates negotiation on the withdrawal arrangements and the future relationship with the EU. This agreement will be arrived at by the qualified majority system at the Council and with the consent of the European Parliament.

4. The exiting state will cease to be an EU member from the date of entry into force of the agreement  (as negotiated) or failing that, two years after the notification of the intention to leave. However, the European Council, acting unanimously, in agreement with the exiting state can extend the period beyond 2 years (with no time limit)

5. The UK government has not yet notified the European Council. The UK prime minister is resigning with effect from October and has stated that it should be the responsibility of his successor to notify the European Council. Some EU senior officials have argued that the UK should notify immediately to speed up the process but there is no legal obligation for the notification to come within a specific time period and this demand has been dropped. It could well be the case that the notification will be a long time coming, even after October, (or maybe never, if circumstances arise that persuade the UK government and parliament to ignore or rerun the referendum).

6. There is enormous uncertainty about the detail of a post exit situation, there is uncertainty about what the UK government will want (and be willing to concede ), there is uncertainty about the negotiating position of the EU (punish the UK or minimise changes in the economic relations), there is uncertainty about the time scale of the process and finally there is great uncertainty about the economic effects of whatever is agreed.

7. The eventual deal will probably have to be approved by the UK parliament and currently the House of Commons is anti-Brexit by a large majority. The final deal may well fall far short of what the Brexit supporters currently expect.

8. The EU has a high degree of economic integration and the Single Market allows the free (or nearly free) mobility of goods, services, capital and labour. The EU and the Brexit side are in favour of free trade. The Brexit side would happily accept the three freedoms of goods, services and capital but are strongly against free movement of labour and people. It is unlikely that the EU would allow continuing full access to the single market for goods, services and capital without labour freedom. This is likely to be the main sticking point in negotiations on a new economic relationship.

9. Membership of the European Economic Area has been identified as a possible post EU regime. Norway is currently in this position. But full membership of the EEA includes mobility of people and also a significant contribution to the EU budget. Alternatively the UK might relate to the EU in much the same way as does China, Russia or the USA at present. This would not include labour mobility but also includes much lower trade liberalisation in services including financial services which the UK does not want.

10. Brexit has two effects. It has generated enormous uncertainty as to future EU/UK economic rules of engagement. This has had a negative impact, and will have a continuing impact, on sterling, stock markets, investment decisions, consumer decisions and overall economic confidence. The second effect is that when the uncertainty is gone (which may be a long time away) the rules governing economic relationships will be different and this will affect business models, market access and transactions costs of UK related business. How different, depends on the details of the new agreement.

11. Brexit will worsen the UK economic performance in the immediate and short term. This will reduce its demand for imports which will hit Irish exporters. This will, in turn, reduce the Irish growth performance.

12. The new deal will be negotiated by the EU as an entity. While Ireland will have an input into the EU negotiating position (and it may be a strong input reflecting our particular political, social and economic relationship with the UK), the final deal will not necessarily reflect all of the Irish concerns. For example, the EU may not be willing to allow a common travel area between the UK and Ireland if the UK will not allow the same mobility of people from elsewhere in the EU).

13. Brexit has caused a large decline in Sterling which is likely to persist, to some extent, for some time if not long term. A much lower Sterling reduces the competitiveness of exports from Ireland to the UK and improves the competitiveness of imports from the UK. Consumers may benefit from the latter but Irish producers competing on the domestic market will lose out. A lower value of Sterling also reduces the attractiveness of Ireland for UK tourists. Fluctuations in the exchange rate with Sterling are not a new phenomenon for the Irish economy but the Brexit related decline is large and likely to be long lasting.

14. As noted in a previous blog a likely positive for the Irish economy is the reduction in the attractiveness of the UK as a centre for servicing the EU single market for both inward foreign investment and domestic UK enterprises because of the likely reduction in ease of access between the EU and the UK depending on the eventual deal. Ireland stands willing and able to give a new English-speaking home to these projects. On the negative side, the UK will have more freedom to improve its tax attractiveness for these projects. Ireland’s increased attractiveness as an English speaking business-friendly location relative to a UK which is outside the EU has substantial economic potential.

15. There is an overall short term negative economic impact arising from the uncertainty which will reduce Ireland’s growth performance. The decline in sterling is likely to be long lasting with its associated negative economic effects ranging from lower inward tourism, increased cross border shopping, reduced exports and increased imports. The ongoing uncertainty will reduce investor and consumer confidence. However, we are still a long way from tariffs, quotas, labour permits, visas, border controls and additional documentation in our economic relationships with the UK.

 

Anthony Foley is Senior Lecturer in Economics in DCU Business School, and lectures on the Executive MBA Programme.

Brian Harney, Senior Lecturer in DCU Business School provides insight into managerial lessons learnt as Ireland advance in The European Championships.

Successful qualification for EURO 2016, including memorable results against the world champions are a cause for optimism amongst Irish soccer fans. Martin O’Neill and Roy Keane appear to have crafted a sense of purpose and the beginning of consistency while inspiring or re-invigorating individual performances.  Elevated results have served as a catalyst for Irish fans to (re)gain recognition as, in memorable media commentary, ‘the Aviva finally became Lansdowne Road‘. Overall,  the dynamic duo of O’Neill and Keane have shown they can manage efficiently whilst leading effectively. One can only hope this carries forward so that Euro 2016 proves more memorable and successful than the dreadful disappointment of 2012. If this feat is to be realised lessons must be continuously learnt to avoid succumbing to the type of managerial faux pas characteristic of the Trapattoni reign.

Utilise the full pool of talent available to the best of its ability

There was a growing sense that Trapattoni did not fully engage the talent that was available to him (this included the likes of Wes Hoolahan, Keiran Westwood, James McCarthy, and Darren Gibson who warmed the bench for the entire Euro 2012 tournament). Even where he did pick different players he did not exploit their strengths by deploying them in their best positions. This oversight becomes all the more severe in the context of a small football country like Ireland, where the initial talent pool is already severely limited

Pay attention to detail and keep close to the action

Trapattoni was apparently fond of saying “they are little details, but the little details are very important”. Despite this rhetoric his lack of enthusiasm for attending premiership games and visiting football grounds was frequently commented upon.  Understanding the ebb and flow of a player’s performance in the full context of a game cannot be done remotely via DVDs; there is simply no substitute for being close to the action. It is useful to recollect the story of Jack Charlton visiting Oxford United to see John Aldridge play and being introduced to a player previously not on the radar called Ray Houghton.

Foster inclusiveness accompanied by a unified sense of purpose

From the early guitar incident with Andy Reid, Trapattoni’s reign was characterized by a growing tension, distance and frequent falling out with his own players. Man management was not Trapattoni’s forte. With the legacy of Saipan as the media benchmark for football bust-ups Trapattoni’s failures in player relations might at first seem trivial. However, the list known to have run-ins with Trapattoni suggests otherwise (Kevin Doyle, Stephen Ireland, Stephen Kelly, Marc Wilson, Stephen Hunt Kevin Foley, Darron Gibson, and Shane Long). Rather than constructively engage players for the Irish cause, Trapattoni frequently pursued destructive vendettas which fragmented relations. Stephen Reid was an early regular in Trapattoni’s line-ups but on-going injury problems led to his career being dismissed off hand by the Italian. There also appeared to be limited reward for loyalty or recognition of player’s allegiance and pride in playing for Ireland. Present for over 7 years in every squad when he was fit to play, Kevin Doyle received news of his omission from the squad for the double-header with Sweden and Austria via text message.

Understand the significance of the top management team

It is perhaps no coincidence that the successful years of the Trapattoni reign were those where Liam Brady held the position of Assistant Manager. With expertise on the workings of the FAI and Irish football, vast insights and experience into the English Premier league, coupled with an extensive football network Brady’s value to Trapattoni cannot be underestimated. Indeed, one wonders if in picking Roy Keane as an assistant Martin O’Neill is also attempting to leverage something similar by way of Irish expertise and public association. The  months leading up to June 2016 should offer more insight on the longevity of this fledgling partnership.

Be open to change when required

Trapattoni remained committed to his cautious approach and tactics even when most commentators and fans called for, and ultimately the results mandated, change. He likewise remained loyal to players like Darren O’Dea, Glen Whelan and Paul McShane when their performances at international level were not always deserving of it. More often than not key tactical or player changes were the result of injury or retirements rather than a change in mindset. Notably, in those performances best remembered, including against Italy and France, it has been suggested that the players pursued their own desired approach rather than rigidly adhering to the Trapattoni prescription. Overall, Trapattoni cast a technical shadow over Ireland’s play which served to inhibit creativity and suggested a distrust of his players.

Of course there is an argument that the distance, or even arrogance, of Trapattoni may have been a reflection of a Keanite type quest for professionalism. There are cultural differences likely to be at play here also; Italian football is a patient, technical and slow burning candle, only intermittently lit with the type of gung-ho frenzied excitement or action that Irish fans might expect. Trapattoni also inherited one of the weaker teams of current times, while Thierry Henry had a huge hand in ensuring lady luck was not on his side. In years and in past success Trapattoni is clearly deserving of respect. Nonetheless his desired approach did not result in Irish glory and may have ultimately been self-defeating. Hopefully June 2016 will provide evidence of lessons learnt and progress made. COYBIG.

Posted on LinkedIn by Brian Harney, Senior Lecturer in DCU.

Original post: DCUBS Insight – Managerial Lessons from the Trapattoni Reign

Congratulations to all DCU Business School students receiving their exam results today!

If you are yet to check your results, they can be found at: https://www.examresults.dcu.ie/

On your results page, each transcript will include a grade next to each module which conforms to a particular Result Code i.e P for Pass, F for Fail etc. You will find a glossary of all the Result Codes and what they indicate at the bottom of your results page.

If you have failed an exam, don’t panic! To register for your re-sit exams, a link will be provided on your Student Apps page under ‘My Details’ from 27 June. Registry also have a link with all the relevant information at https://www.dcu.ie/registry/examinations/resits.shtml The re-sit exam period is scheduled to take place from the 8th until the 20th of August inclusive. For more information around important dates see DCU’s academic calendar.

If you have questions or would like to discuss any of the results you receive, two days have been designated whereby you may sit down with the relevant lecturer and your exam paper to discuss your marks. These consultation days are Thursday June 23th and Friday June 24th. If you wish to do this, you should email your lecturer as soon as possible to arrange a meeting with them. Some lecturers may have a feature on loop which you can schedule a consultation day pertaining to the module. Forms for appealing results can be found here.

Only those undergraduate students who have completed their final year will receive a physical transcript in the post, while all others will receive ETranscripts. All postgraduate students will receive a transcript where you have an overall final result for your programme. E-transcripts will be available from your Student Apps page under the link ‘Digital’, one week from the release of your results. If you wish to receive a physical copy of your transcript, you can email Registry at registry@dcu.ie, or by calling into the Registry Office in The Street in the Henry Grattan Building. Physical transcripts cost EUR5 for one year or EUR15 for a full set including all years.

If you have successfully passed your exams and you are not sure yet where to go next, why not consider carrying out a Masters in DCU Business School? Click here for more information on DCU Business School Masters programmes. If you’re ready to hit the working world, check out our Job Hunting Tips to help you kick off the next chapter!

So your exams are finished and you’re one step closer to the big bad world of work.

Whether your finished your final exams or just looking for part time work, over the summer job hunting can sometimes fall to the bottom of your to-do list. It can therefore be useful to schedule at least 15 minutes a day to work on your CV and search job listings as opportunities come and go quickly. Job hunting can be a daunting process and you may have to prepare yourself  to get turned down from a number of jobs, or perhaps not hear back from others before the right one comes along. Here are a number of tips to help kick start your job hunt:

Job Hunting Tips

  • Make sure your CV is up to date and professionally laid out.
  • If you have a LinkedIn account, make sure this too is up to date and the information included matches your CV. (Check out the LinkedIn Student Job Hunting Handbook for tips)
  • Cast an eye over each of your social networks, is everything that you have publicly visible appropriate?
  • Search the hashtag #Jobfairy on Twitter for roles that may not be advertised on formal websites.
  • There are many Irish jobs websites that pop up after a simple Google search including Jobbio.com, Monster.ie, IrishJobs.ie, Jobs.ie, Indeed.com amongst others. Check these daily to search for vacancies in your field.
  • Check out LinkedIn Jobs section and the specific career sections of company websites where further vacancies may be advertised.
  • Visit the DCU Engage portal where a number of jobs are posted.
  • Search on websites such as Eventbrite.ie for networking events near you that may give rise to employment opportunities.
  • If you feel like you want to become more specialised in your field before seeking full time employment, consider furthering your education with a postgraduate degree in DCU Business School – approximately 95% of our Masters graduates are employed or in further study within 6 months of graduating.
  • Consider starting your own business.
  • Be persistent and stay positive during your search – belief in yourself and in your abilities is a major factor in successful job hunting.

The DCU Careers Service provides inclusive service to support, guide and empower students to make informed career decisions to maximise your personal and professional development. They have have a number of resources to help you along the way including information on how to put together your CV and how to prepare for interviews and you can even book an appointment to meet with a Careers Advisor for one-on-one advice.

The Careers team  is committed to providing a wide variety of professional services to support you in making career decisions that are best suited to your qualifications, interests, abilities and aspirations. For more information visit DCU Careers Service.