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Congratulations to Catherine McManus (BSc in Marketing Innovation and Technology 2014) who has won the Marketing Society of Ireland LePere award.

This annual award was set up in commemoration of the late John LePere  and is open to undergraduate marketing students from all Dublin universities, awarded to the student with the highest grade in a marketing module in final year who has gone on to study marketing at postgraduate level.

Catherine is currently studying for her Masters in Marketing at DCU Business School.

Speaking at the event, Joanne Lynch, Programme Director of the MSc in Marketing commented “We are delighted that Catherine has been recognised by the Marketing Society for academic excellence. She is a very worthy recipient of the LePere Award. This is the third year in a row that a DCU student has won this Award with Catherine following Karl Davitt (2013) and Sinead Foy (2012), which highlights the high calibre of our marketing graduates”.

Pictured above are Catherine McManus and the Chairman of the Marketing Society Mark Nolan

Congratulations to Aileen Joyce, a graduate of the Professional Diploma in Accounting (2011), who was the main prizewinner at the recent Irish Tax Institute conferring ceremony.

She achieved first place overall and first place in 2 papers, indirect taxes and Personal Taxes in the final exams in Autumn 2014.

Aileen makes a habit of winning prizes! She achieved 3rd place in the FAE in 2013. She currently works in KPMG.

Congratulations also, to Amy Lyons, a graduate of the Professional Diploma in Accounting (2012) who was placed 5th out of the 1,468 candidates who sat the full exam in the FAE exams of Chartered Accountants Ireland. Amy is currently working with PwC.

The DCU Professional Diploma in Accounting is the leading conversion course of its kind in Ireland, designed for non-business and accounting graduates who want to kickstart a career in Accountancy. The 8 month full-time programme gives students exemptions from the first set of Chartered Accountants Ireland Examinations and prepares them for success in both their future exams and professional accounting roles.

For more information, please click here.

If you missed the Ba in Accounting & Finance Presentation at the DCU Open Day last week, you can find the presentation below! This is the leading course in Ireland for those considering a career as an accountant or in finance related roles. For more information visit dcu.ie/dc115

Sixteen graduating students made history in DCU this week when they became the first class to graduate from DCU Business School with a BSc in Aviation Management (with Pilot Studies).  The students, who have spent four years in full time study, have been hugely successful in securing employment with many taking up jobs prior to even completing their degree. The graduating class of 2014 included two students who have already completed their flight training. Cadets Sam Halpenny and Hosam Karim have both completed a 15 month residential, integrated course with Flight Training Europe (FTE) Airline First Office Programme, based in Jerez, Spain. The FTE Jerez programme takes students with little or no previous flying experience to the beginning of a career as an airline pilot.   DCU chose FTE Jerez as one of its approved flight training providers in 2012.

Dublin City University is committed to supporting the development of a dynamic aviation industry both in Ireland and internationally. In September this year, DCU established the Dublin Aviation Institute, through an innovative partnership with daa International. The Dublin Aviation Institute is a new joint venture designed to deliver global leadership in aviation education and research and is based at both Dublin Airport and DCU.

The Dublin Aviation Institute will enable students to experience a unique combination of academic excellence and a live airport environment, which will enhance and compliment their overall learning experience. It will work closely with industry partners to support the growth of the sector and the increasing professionalization of its workforce.

Earlier this year, the BSc in Aviation Management (with Pilot Studies) Degree Programme at DCU Business School was awarded the Overall Aviation Academic Education Award at the inaugural Aviation Industry Awards. This degree addresses gaps in the education of those entering the aviation industry: for those who wish to become commercial pilots, it offers a route to a professional qualification as a commercial pilot combined with a strong background in business education; for those who see themselves playing other roles in the industry, it provides the necessary expertise to maximise your potential in this ever-changing industry.

The Dublin Aviation Institute has been created through an innovative partnership between

Programme Director, Dr. PJ Byrne (centre) is pictured, with the class of 2014, each of whom graduated with a BSc in Aviation Management (with Pilot Studies).

Talent management has become one of the most prevalent topics in the field of people management and development for practitioners and academics alike. However, while managers do appear to appreciate the importance of talent management, they often fail to manage it effectively, and the linkages between talent management and organizational performance remain unclear. In this invited feature article, David Collings, Professor of Human Resource Management in DCU Business School, argues that the failure to effectively manage and develop talent can be traced, in part, to a narrow conceptualization of performance in much thinking on talent management. At an organizational level, this means that performance is generally considered solely in terms of shareholder returns while ignoring other stakeholders. This translates into HR systems that fail to effectively align individuals and organizations in the generation of value. This article foregrounds employees as stakeholders and argues that organizations that are defined by a sense of purpose and that prioritize employees as stakeholders generally have higher levels of alignment between organizational and employee goals with more highly motivated employees and ultimately more sustainable performance. Some implications for research on talent management are developed.

This Journal Article has been published in Human Resource Development Quarterly (HRDQ) , the first scholarly journal focused directly on the evolving field of human resource development (HRD). It provides a central focus for research on human resource development issues as well as the means for disseminating such research. HRDQ recognizes the interdisciplinary nature of the HRD field and brings together relevant research from the related fields, such as economics, education, management, sociology, and psychology. It provides an important link in the application of theory and research to HRD practice. HRDQ publishes scholarly work that addresses the theoretical foundations of HRD, HRD research, and evaluation of HRD interventions and contexts.

The full article can be found in full here.

For more information on our courses in human resource management and organisational behaviour, please visit our course pages.

The widespread adoption of social media is transforming the consumer-brand relationship. Social media is allowing consumers connect with other users, create, consume and control access to content (Hoffman and Novak, 2012). Research suggests that social media increases brand relationship depth and loyalty, and generates incremental purchase behaviour (Laroche et al., 2012; Kim and Ko, 2012; Pooja et al., 2012). It is not surprising therefore that commentators suggest that marketers should target social media users who are more likely to exert an influence on their network in order to facilitate brand recommendations (Iyengar, Han, & Gupta, 2009). But who are these influentials? Goldenberg et al. (2009) suggest that there are only two types of influential that impact information diffusion – innovators and followers.

influence definition

 

Our study looks at early users or in Goldenberg at al.’s terminology, innovators, of two social networking sites, Twitter and Google+, and the effects of personality and mode of information sharing on social influence scoring. Specifically, we look at:

1. How does (i) extraversion, (ii) openness and (iii) conscientiousness influence:

  • Information sharing behaviour
  • Rumour sharing behavior

2. How does (i) information sharing behaviour and (ii) rumour sharing behaviour impact social network site influence scores?

Early Twitter users were identified through a public list and through the joining date listed on user public profiles. As the study occurred during the Google+ closed field test, all users were deemed early users. Two discrete survey instruments were designed, one for Twitter and one for Google+ to provide for different SNS validation checks. To assess the personality traits of respondents, we tested extraversion, openness and conscientiousness with the scale of Gosling et al. (2003) while information and rumour sharing scale were extracted from Marett and Joshi (2009). The SNS score was the independent variable in our model and this was measured using two commercial SNS influence score providers, PeerIndex and Klout.

Our study hypothesized that that Extraversion and Openness were two personality traits that should positively influence both Information and Rumor sharing behavior (H1 and H2), while Conscientiousness would have a reverse effect on Information (+) and Rumor (-) sharing behavior (H3 and H4). We also hypothesized that both Information and Rumor sharing behavior should positively influence social network influence scoring. A structural equation model using AMOS was used to test these hypotheses.

AMOS

 The model suggests:

  • Early users of social network sites who are more extrovert or more open or more conscientious are more likely to share information
  • Information sharing and rumor sharing should be treated as two distinct constructs in the discussion of social network influence.
  • All three traits were negatively related to rumor sharing. Only the effects of extroversion and conscientiousness were significant.
  • Both information sharing and rumor sharing impacted positively and significantly on social network site influence scores.

While previous literature has suggested that it is difficult to identify market mavens (Goldsmith et al., 2006), early users of social media can be identified easily and conveniently. This may provide firms with the opportunity to target potential innovators and early adopters much more efficiently and thus accelerate diffusion of marketing messages. Our study suggests filtering these adopters by messaging behaviour may also be of assistance with a greater of emphasis of resources being placed on those social network users who share information rather than rumor. While identifying these potential influencers would seem to be more efficient than identifying mavens, further research is required to understand the most effective way and time to engage with them. Finally, it would seem social network influence scores provide useful signals for identifying social media users likely to share information. Social media users characterised by a combination of high influence scores and propensity for information sharing are powerful assets for firms, particularly if they have relatively large social networks. Engaging with these influencers represents a relatively low cost mechanism for indirectly reaching target markets through word of mouth on social networks.

The research was conducted by Dr Theo Lynn (DCU Business School), Dr Laurent Muzellec (UCD), Dr Barbara Caemerrer (ESSCA), Prof. Darach Turley (DCU Business School) and Bettina Wuerdinger (DCU Business School).

This blog post was originally published on The CrowdResearch.org blog, Follow the Crowd

DCU Business School offers full and part time Postgraduate Courses in Digital Marketing. Fill out the short form below to get Course Information:

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A practicum is an assignment designed to give students supervised practical application of previously studied theory. In DCU Business School, our MSc in Management, MSc in E-Commerce, MSc in Marketing and MSc in Digital Marketing students have the choice of undertaking a individual dissertation, which is largely an academic piece of research, or a group practicum.

The practicums are sourced from a wide range of organisations, both business and not-for-profit. The students make proposals for these projects and start working on them in March. A report of work completed is submitted at the end of July. This will contain a piece of primary research, and some form of applied activity. Later in August, student groups present their projects to their peers, DCUBS Faculty and external guests. Unlike dissertations, students have the opportunity to address a real-world problem with a live client or indeed pursue their own business idea. Some companies this year included Microsoft, Enterprise-Rent-a-Car, and DCU Centre for Family Business.

The DCU Business School Practicum Programme also gives the Business School an opportunity to engage with the wider business community and forms a central part of our civic engagement strategy.

Hear more about the Practicum from the MSc in Management Course Director below:

 

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While Ireland will not grace the stage at the world cup in Brazil, there is still an air of optimism around the prospects for the national team. This has been reinforced by the recent performance against Italy and Roy Keane’s apparent commitment to the cause. In building a solid foundation for the future, Martin O’Neill and Roy Keane could do worse than learning from some key managerial faux pas of the Giovanni Trapattoni reign.

Utilise the full pool of talent available to the best of its ability

There was a growing sense that Trapattoni did not fully engage the talent that was available to him (this included the likes of Wes Hoolahan, Keiran Westwood, James McCarthy, and Darren Gibson who warmed the bench for the entire Euro 2012 tournament). Even where he did pick different players he did not exploit their strengths by deploying them in their best positions. This oversight becomes all the more severe in the context of a small football country like Ireland, where the initial talent pool is already severely limited

Pay attention to detail and keep close to the action

Trapattoni was apparently fond of saying “they are little details, but the little details are very important”. Despite this rhetoric his lack of enthusiasm for attending premiership games and visiting football grounds was frequently commented upon.  Understanding the ebb and flow of a player’s performance in the full context of a game cannot be done remotely via DVDs; there is simply no substitute for being close to the action. Many will recollect the story of Jack Charlton visiting Oxford United to see John Aldridge play and being introduced to a player previously not on the radar called Ray Houghton.

Foster inclusiveness accompanied by a unified sense of purpose

From the early guitar incident with Andy Reid, Trapattoni’s reign was characterized by a growing tension, distance and frequent falling out with his own players. Man management was not Trapattoni’s forte. With the legacy of Saipan as the media benchmark for football bust-ups Trapattoni’s failures in player relations might at first seem trivial. However, the list known to have run-ins with Trapattoni’s suggests otherwise (Kevin Doyle, Stephen Ireland, Stephen Kelly, Marc Wilson, Stephen Hunt Kevin Foley, Darron Gibson, and Shane Long). Rather than constructively engage players for the Irish cause, Trapattoni frequently pursued destructive vendettas which fragmented relations. Stephen Reid was an early regular in Trapattoni’s line-ups but on-going injury problems led to his career being dismissed off hand by the Italian who commented publicly that it would be ‘very, very difficult’, for Reid to return to his best following a knee injury. There also appeared to be limited reward for loyalty or recognition of player’s allegiance and pride in playing for Ireland. Present for over 7 years in every squad when he was fit to play, Kevin Doyle received news of his omission from the squad for the double-header with Sweden and Austria via text message.

Understand the significance of the top management team

It is perhaps no coincidence that the successful years of the Trapattoni reign were those where Liam Brady held the position of Assistant Manager. With expertise on the workings of the FAI and Irish football, vast insights and experience into the English Premier league, coupled with an extensive football network Brady’s value to Trapattoni cannot be underestimated. Indeed, one wonders if in picking Roy Keane as an assistant Martin O’Neill is also attempting to leverage something similar by way of Irish expertise and public association.

Be open to change when required

Trapattoni remained committed to his cautious approach and tactics even when most commentators and fans called for, and ultimately the results mandated, change. He likewise remained loyal to players like Darren O’Dea, Glen Whelan and Paul McShane when their performances at international level were not always deserving of it. More often than not key tactical or player changes were the result of injury or retirements rather than a change in mindset. Notably, in those performances best remembered, including against Italy and France, it has been suggested that the players pursued their own desired approach rather than rigidly adhering to the Trapattoni prescription. Overall, Trapattoni cast a technical shadow over Ireland’s play which served to inhibit creativity and suggested a distrust of his players.

Of course there is an argument that the distance, or even arrogance, of Trapattoni may have been a reflection of a Keanite type quest for professionalism. There are cultural differences likely to be at play here also; Italian football is a patient, technical and slow burning candle, only intermittently lit with the type of gung-ho frenzied excitement or action that Irish fans might expect. Trapattoni also inherited one of the weaker teams of current times, while Thierry Henry had a huge hand in ensuring lady luck was not on his side. In years and in past success Trapattoni is clearly deserving of respect. Nonetheless his desired approach did not result in Irish glory and may have ultimately been self-defeating. For the fledging dynamic duo of Martin O’Neill and Roy Keane the challenge is to embrace the key lessons from the Trapattoni reign by managing efficiently while also leading effectively.

Brian Harney is a Lecturer in Strategy and HRM at DCU Business School and Deputy Director (Knowledge) of the LInK research centre 

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