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Brian MacNeice graduated from the DCU Business School Executive MBA in 1997, and, following a career in management consulting, founded Kotinos Partners in 2010 offering tailored services in performance consultancy, strategy and training grounded in over ten years’ research and experience in the field of High Performance. Brian is the recently published author of the book “Powerhouse: Insider accounts into the world’s top high-performance organizations”.

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DCU Executive MBA alumnus in profile: Paul Routledge of True North Consultants

Paul Routledge graduated from the DCU Executive MBA in 2018. Formerly Director of Operations at Keelings, Paul has since gone on to establish True North Consultants, providing strategy management consulting services to startups and established players. Here he recalls some of his time on the MBA.

What inspired you to do an MBA?

I was at a point where I had vast experience but wanted to validate this, grow my knowledge of areas outside of my specific experience, the MBA ticked all of these boxes for me.

Why did you choose DCU?

I came in a few times to open evenings, meeting current students and alumni and every one of them exuded enthusiasm along with the realities of how difficult it can be.

I was impressed with the learning spaces and facilities and also the technology to enable remote access to library and learning materials was helpful. On meeting the Programme Director I got a real sense that the program at DCU was much more real world orientated instead of academic alone which also appealed greatly.

How did the MBA change the way you work?

Dramatically, I find myself approaching challenges in a much different space, thinking much more critically and seeking out evidence and research to inform my decisions. I used to sometimes approach certain tasks or challenges with an element of fear of the unknown but working outside of your comfort zone as frequently as you do in the MBA and in a safe space makes you approach these once scary issues with confidence and methods to work it out and show up informed and prepared. There are so many elements I could add but I doubt you’d want to hear them all !

How do you apply the MBA in your role now?

Since completing the MBA I made the leap to go it alone as a freelance Management Consultant. I still read and research the issues and challenges I’m solving for my clients with many of the tools and approaches I learned during the MBA, coupled with my experience I’m finding I’m able to offer ideas and solutions from very different and more objective and creative angles than managers and leaders from within those businesses.

Any advice for someone considering an MBA?

I am married, and have 5 young children so taking on the MBA and needing to study for 20/30 hours a week was tough, I couldn’t have done that without the support of my other half, it’s crucial that they are fully aware of how challenging this can be for them as your away with your head in the study ! You need a good, understanding boss also because the more you can tie your assignments to real work challenges than the better for you and them. I had that engagement from my boss, and they benefited greatly from me working on business challenges throughout. What you put in you will get out but make sure you look after yourself – you need time out, time to exercise and switch off so build that into your schedule. Finally make time to get to know your classmates you can learn so much and make some great friends and advisors that I’m still close to today.

 

To explore the DCU Executive MBA please visit https://business.dcu.ie/course/executive-mba/

DCU Business School and the Gaelic Players Association (GPA) are proud to announce the renewal of their scholarship partnership for 2018/2019. The scholarships are jointly funded between DCU Business School and the GPA and offer financial assistance to GPA members to undertake DCU’s Executive MBA and Masters programmes.

Past recipients of the Executive MBA Scholarships include Fermanagh’s Chris Breen, Leitrim’s Rob Lowe, Westmeath’s David O’Shaughnessy, Kilkenny hurling star Richie Hogan, Dublin’s Denis Bastick and James McCarthy and former All-Ireland winners Jason Sherlock (Dublin) and Justin McNulty (Armagh).

Mayo veteran Barry Moran and Down footballer Conor McGinn are the latest inter-county players to be awarded scholarships for the prestigious DCU Business School MBA, awarded scholarships in 2017/2018.

Dublin hurler Cian Boland (MSc Digital Marketing), Waterford dual player Donal Breathnach and Sligo footballer Cian Breheny, both MSc Business Management, were all awarded Masters scholarships in 2017/2018.

You can read about the experiences of current MBA student Bryan Murphy as a GPA scholar at DCU Business School, here: http://dcubsblog.dcu.ie/gpa-scholar-bryan-murphy-mba-experience/

DCU has a global reputation as Ireland’s University of Enterprise, known for its strong links between academic, research and industry partners. DCU Business School proactively contributes to the development of individuals, industry and society  and is recognised nationally and internationally for the first-class quality of its business education programmes.

The Executive MBA programme is gradireland’s Postgraduate Course of the Year for 2018 in the business and finance category. The MSc in Management is also ranked in the top 100 in Europe by the prestigious Financial Times.

GPA and DCU 2017 launch

The Dean of DCU Business School Professor Anne Sinnott commented “we are delighted to renew our partnership with the GPA. Many of our previous scholarship recipients have achieved great success in their programmes, their careers and on the playing field and we are very proud of them. The GPA/WPA scholars join our world-class programmes along with students from around the world and will no doubt contribute enormously to these programmes”


Information for GPA players considering applying for a scholarship:

Applications should be emailed to Caroline Enright, Senior Communications Officer at DCU Business School at caroline.enright@dcu.ie with the subject marked ‘GPA DCU Scholarship Application.’ This email should have a personal statement attached, which should be no more than one A4 page in length. It should outline why the applicant is interested in applying for this programme, what they believe they will gain from the programme and what skills and attributes they can bring to a masters classroom. Applicants should also enclose their CV. The deadline for this scholarship is June 28th 2018. Shortlisted candidates will be invited for interview.

See business.dcu.ie for more information on courses and https://www.gaelicplayers.com/ for further information on GPA scholarships.

If you need further information, please contact Noel Connors, GPA Player Engagement Officer – Education at noel@gaelicplayers.com

For decades now, we had a window to the west: we looked to the US and Silicon Valley for emerging trends in global business, innovation and business development. This year’s DCU Business School Executive MBA class took a different route; taking a path less travelled, embarking on a trip to Hong Kong to examine, first-hand, the nuances of global business developments through a very different lens.

A recent piece I read cites a relevant analogy, describing China not as an emerging market, but as a sleeping Dragon; awakening from a long slumber following a hiatus from its heydays under various dynasties. To prove such an analogy true, one has to look no further than Hong Kong to see that the dragon has already had her morning coffee.

Few global cities can rival the dynamism and resilience of a city like Hong Kong; with one step in China and the other firmly seeking to grow trade with the west. An established global finance hub, Hong Kong has cemented its place as a conduit for facilitating and doing business with China. Espousing an exciting ‘open for business’ mantra, the city, which is currently ‘under new management’ serves as the new silk road between east and west.

The Executive MBA class were exposed to a wide diversity of Multinational and indigenous firms including global consultancy organisations, insurance providers, local manufacturers, creative marketing firms, executive search agencies, hoteliers and social ventures. Insights were gained on the intricacies and opportunities of doing business within the region and more specifically on tapping into the global behemoth that is China.

Among the highlights, the Executive MBA class were invited to visit the Irish Consulate based in Hong Kong and to learn about the scale of cross-border trade currently being conducted within the region. In the evenings we sampled some of the finest cuisine Asia has to offer while taking in the bright lights of this vibrant city. Among the growing expat community we heard more than once an old adage that ‘a New York minute is a Hong Kong second’. One thing remains certain; I’d happily go back for seconds.

Dr Marty Reilly, Lecturer in Management

Learn more about the DCU Business School Executive MBA here

Congratulations to Doireann Sheelan, a DCU Executive MBA student, who received a Special Award for her individual contribution at the recent MBA Association of Ireland Strategy Challenge competition, held recently at Waterford Institute of Technology.

Doireann was part of team, with fellow Executive MBA Students Kalum King, Neil Curran and James Cannon, who presented on the case study “Turkish Airlines – Widen Your World”. While they did not win the competition (the prize went to WIT) they acquitted themselves admirably receiving great praise from the judges for the depth of their analysis.

DCU1

DCU Executive MBA Team (Kalum King, Neil Curran and James Cannon)

This annual competition, hosted by the MBA Association of Ireland (MBAAI), attracts entrants from all the universities and institutes of technology in Ireland that run MBA programmes. Peter McNamara, Professor of Management & Head of School at NUI Maynooth, and Chairperson of the competition, commented: “All four of the teams did a very good job of analysing the case and making recommendations, especially under considerable time pressure.”

The DCU Executive MBA is now recruiting ambitious participants for September 2016.

For more information, visit postgrad.dcu.ie/mba or  email mba@dcu.ie.

 

Pictured is the DCU MBA team with the MBA Association of Ireland President Alacoque McMenamin,

In this blog, Kalum King (MBA1) shares his experience of year 1 of the DCU Executive MBA programme:

With the first year of the MBA at DCU now drawing to a close, it feels like the perfect time to reflect on the journey I have been through since the course commenced in September 2015. Like many, I was intrigued by the prospect of what the MBA program at DCU could offer me in terms of knowledge and experience.

My MBA journey commenced with an ‘Induction’ in early September. After the initial meeting with the rest of the class it was clear to me that this was going to be a unique opportunity for us all and would provide an excellent opportunity to learn from each other in a very comfortable but challenging learning environment.

I had often heard that the MBA experience is not just about the lectures, the assignments and exams, but that a key aspect of the experience is the interaction and knowledge sharing with your fellow students. The mix of personalities and calibre of my fellow students was impressive and they had experience within a wide range of industries from the armed forces to pharmaceuticals. The ‘Induction’ was a great way for everyone to transition onto the course and a great opportunity to get to know the group you would be spending the next two years with.

With the ‘Induction’ now over and everyone now comfortable (ish!) with referencing, so began the Semester 1 modules of Marketing, Organisational Behaviour & Change and Accounting for Decision Making. Marketing was a very enjoyable and interesting module, and probably the one I learnt the most from in terms of practical application to the business I work for. A key aspect of this module was a group presentation to be delivered to the lecturer and the rest of the class. My group found ourselves tackling the subject of ‘Digital Technology in the Luxury Goods Market’ and for which we scored relatively well on. Not bad I thought for a group that consisted of people from a range of industries that included public sector, pharmaceuticals and building materials! Straight away the class found themselves being challenged in a healthy way that would ultimately enhance our knowledge base of the subject.

Organisational Behaviour & Change was next up covering key business concepts such as, organisational culture, transformational leadership and (everybody’s favourite!) power. The delivery of this topic by the lecturer was a key highlight for the class. The lecturer’s friendly and natural teaching style really brought the course to life for us all and was very enjoyable indeed.

As a Chartered Accountant myself and having completed many years of study on the subject I must admit I wasn’t thrilled by the prospect of the Accounting for Decision Making module. However, I was impressed by the lecturer’s ability to break down difficult accounting concepts into bite-size chunks for the class and I felt the class responded very well to this approach. I think everyone made it through the class okay!

A couple of exams in January 2016 brought Semester 1 to a close and after a short break Semester 2 commenced.

The topics in Semester 2 included Business Economics, Business Strategy and Managing People & Organisations. Business Economics was an extremely interesting module but highly challenging as well, as we all tried to get our heads round the intricacies of the Irish and Global economy (and this was before ‘Brexit’ !!).

Within the Business Strategy module the class encountered what must be considered as one of the most unique and effective learning tools, known as the ‘Airline Simulation’. This simulation exercise consisted of the groups competing against each other by setting up an airline company (and strategy) and trying to effectively deliver on the company’s strategy within the simulation itself. It really is a brilliant experience and gave opportunity for some groups to obtain ‘bragging rights’ (all in good humour of course!) which I felt added to the overall learning experience.

The final module was Managing People & Organisations which I felt really developed my understanding and thinking process in relation to the topic. By the end of the module I had definitely become a firm supporter of the emerging ‘Evidence Based’ approach to the subject.

I must also mention the fantastic ‘Residency Weekend’ as part of the Enterprise Engagement module. In February 2016 we visited a number of companies in Cork which was a great experience. The companies we visited included Dairygold, Wisetek and Voxpro who kindly facilitated a tour and visit from the class which was a great opportunity for us all and very much appreciated.

Overall, I would describe my experience of the MBA program at DCU as unique, challenging and thoroughly enjoyable. Throughout my first year I have been hugely impressed by the high quality of the program and the overall learning experience from the lecturers to the interaction with my fellow students.

Finally, I would encourage anyone intrigued by what an MBA program can offer to attend one of the ‘taster’ courses held in the DCU Business School. I expect you will be as impressed as I was and I look forward to seeing you next year.

– Kalum King, MBA1

Interested in learning more about our Executive MBA programme? Download our brochure here

The DCU Executive MBA is a two-year part-time programme that is widely recognised as the degree of choice for rising executives with ambitions to be Senior Managers/CEOs, whatever their specialist backgrounds. Here are ten reasons why it may be the programme for you:

1. Accredited and internationally recognised

DCU’s Executive MBA is accredited by the Association of MBAs (AMBA), which assesses the quality of MBA programmes worldwide. You will graduate with an internationally recognised and accredited qualification. DCU Business School is also one of only two schools in Ireland with AACSB accreditation – placing it in the top 5% worldwide.

2. Adding Value to Practice

MBA participants, along with other assignments, will conduct a strategic consultancy project, which integrates the knowledge, skills and values of the programme and provides an opportunity for to deliver real value to your organisation.

3. Leadership Development & Career Management Programme

MBA participants pursue a programme of action-based projects and workshops over 2 years. Self-assessments, and team and facilitator feedback develop self-awareness of own leadership competencies, facilitates targeting development opportunities, deepens emotional intelligence and enhances competence to think and act as a leader and people manager.

4. Enterprise Engagement

The DCU Executive MBA programme embodies the key values of the University’s strategy in its emphasis on enterprise and translation of knowledge into practice. The Enterprise Engagement module includes visits to a number of companies with strong growth strategies. The visits are supported by lectures and our Executive Speaker Series on issues relating to globalisation, sustainability and strategic growth.

5. International Exposure

MBA participants will broaden their perspective and focus upon global organisations on the International Study Week. In recent years, participants have attended lectures on leadership, global strategy and innovation at Harvard, Boston University and Stanford University. Visits to San Francisco, Silicon Valley, and Boston included meetings with start-ups, incubators and multinational organisations focused on innovation, entrepreneurship, leadership, strategy and new technologies.

6. Small class sizes

We believe that an interactive and participative learning environment is best achieved in small classes

7. Academically Rigorous

The MBA teaching faculty are leaders in their field, with many publishing in leading international journals and presenting at international conferences. DCU Business School research priorities emphasise equally the creation of new knowledge (discipline-based scholarship) and the application, transfer and interpretation of knowledge to improve management practice and teaching (contributions to practice).

8. A holistic approach to learning

We adopt three approaches to learning:

  • A focus on knowledge, where participants engage in class-based lectures and workshops
  • A focus on leadership skills, working in a hands-on team-based environment and assess and develop their own leadership competencies
  • A focus on action, engaging in projects applying lessons learnt back into practice
9. Alumni Network

When you join the DCU Executive MBA programme, you will join a global network of almost DCU 16,000 DCU Business School graduates, including 1,000 MBA’s. The DCU Business School Alumni group is a vibrant and active community with many of the graduates participating in events and activities throughout the year. These include:

  • Business Breakfast Briefings
  • Alumni Networking Evenings and Social Events
  • Alumni Careers Day

DCU Business School values its Alumni and appreciates the contribution that they make to the life of the School by their involvement with various initiatives. We also want to be a life-long resource and partner to our Alumni throughout their careers.

10. Employment and Career Prospects

DCU Executive MBA graduates are highly sought after in the jobs market, with many going on to pursue senior management roles in organisations both at home and abroad. Recent graduates are now working in roles such as Client Manager, Construction Director, Enterprise Architect, Financial Controller, Managing Director, Product Manager Sales Director, Senior Software Engineer, and Technical Programme Manager.

Interested in learning more about our Executive MBA programme? Download our brochure here

Give yourself the competitive advantage with DCU Business School. If you want to take your career to the next level, DCU Business School has the part-time postgraduate programme to help you realise your full potential. Part-time study is a very efficient way of raising and updating your skills while keeping your foot firmly in the professional world.

Our part time programmes are tailored for those who want to continue working while studying and usually involve committing a number of afternoons or evenings each week to attend classes or lectures. Undertaking a part-time postgraduate course can be of great benefit to personal and professional development as well as for career progression.

We are currently accepting applications for September 2016 via the Postgraduate Applications Centre (www.pac.ie/dcu) for the following part-time postgraduate programmes:

For details on our full-time postgraduate programmes, please click here.

 

The DCU Executive MBA programme exposes participants to top-performing experienced professionals from international and national business who share their insights on such themes as strategy, leadership, digital technology, entrepreneurship and innovation.

On Thursday 14th April 2016 we had our final MBA Executive Speaker Series for the academic year. Rob O’Toole, Head of HR Shared Services for the Irish Civil Service joined us to share his experiences of Talent Management across the public and private sectors.

The DCU Executive MBA is a two-year part-time programme that is widely recognised as the degree of choice for rising executives with ambitions to be Senior Managers/CEOs, whatever their specialist backgrounds.

DCU is Ireland’s University of Enterprise, which influences and drives our industry engagement strategy and MBA programme design. Our MBA participants learn from academic experts with a high level of industry relevant experience and translational research. This ensures graduates have the most up-to-date knowledge of theory and practice.

Learn more about DCU’s Executive MBA programme

The accounting education change debate is not new, indeed, since the first accounting programmes were offered by universities and professional accountancy bodies in the 19th century, their relevance and currency has been questioned. However, the nature and scale of the change debate has intensified over the past thirty years, as accounting education within higher education has expanded considerably and there has been an explosion in demand for those with accounting knowledge and skills in the global marketplace.

The most enduring criticism of accounting education is that it fails to appropriately prepare professional accountants to meet the challenging and dynamic needs of contemporary organisations. More particularly, it has been reported that many accounting programmes focus on developing technical accounting knowledge and skills at the expense of broader business knowledge and competencies, thus failing to prepare students to cope with knowledge obsolescence and changing demands on accountants in organisations. Many academics also consider that the dominance of the accounting profession in shaping accounting education means that programmes provide “a narrow, functionalist view of the discipline”[1] and fail both to expose students to multiple perspectives of accounting and to enrich their intellectual capabilities such that they can critique current practice and develop innovative ideas.

Many educators have listened to the criticisms and significant changes are evident in the programmes offered by professional bodies and universities. Accounting programmes now focus on developing the multiple types of competences[2] needed by accountants in the modern business world. Further, many programmes provide a wider perspective on accounting and explore topics beyond the traditional, technical syllabus (e.g. sustainability, corporate social responsibility, accounting in society etc.), in addition to embracing both broader business subjects and skills development.

There is no doubt that there is scope to further enrich the education of accountants, however, the time is ripe to shift the focus of the accounting education change debate to the delivery of accounting courses to those who will not become accountants. Non-accountants do not need to be taught the intricacies of technical accounting, instead they need to understand the role of accounting in their organisations and how accounting information impacts on their roles, whether that be as a marketing specialist in a multi-national, a family business owner or a GP in a medical practice. Thus the attention of accounting educators needs to focus more astutely on the content and orientation of the accounting courses taught to MBA students and the undergraduate courses that are taught to general business, engineering, science and humanities students.  If such courses focus on cultivating a contextual understanding of core accounting concepts and also develop some appropriate financial analysis skills, they will provide students with the competence and confidence to participate effectively in the strategic discourse and decision-making in organisations. Thus, by engaging in this debate, accounting educators have an opportunity to add real value to the career prospects of non-accounting specialists who aspire to management and leadership roles.

Barbara Flood is Professor of Accounting and Deputy Dean at DCU Business School. Her research focuses on accounting education and training and she is a member of the Education, Training and Lifelong Learning Board of Chartered Accountants Ireland.

References

[1] Boyce, G. (2004) Critical accounting education: teaching and learning outside the circle, Critical Perspectives on Accounting, 15(4/5), 565-586.

[2] In their model of professional competence, Cheetham and Chivers (1998) contend that professional competence comprises of Knowledge/Cognitive competence, Functional competence, Personal/ Behavioural competence, Values/Ethical competence and a range of meta competencies, such as communication, analysis, reflection. See Cheetham, G and Chivers, G. (1998) The reflective (and competent) practitioner: a model of professional competence which seeks to harmonise the reflective practitioner and competence-based approaches, Journal of European Industrial Training, 22(7), 267-276.